Lender Processing Services LPS and ProVest: Resemblance is uncanny

We all have all got acquainted with LPS and have read about ProVest in connection with Law Offices of David J. Stern. If you take a close look at the two logo’s, don’t they have a resemblance? Look at the colors as well…Hmm are we unlocking another possible link?

 House Flipping Makes A Comeback In Florida Foreclosed Homes Sold On Court House Steps for Cash, David J. Stern Law Office Forecloses Buys and Flips for Profit, FBI Needs to Investigate.

Homeowner Pickets Foreclosure Fraud at Court House: Placerville, CA

This man is fighting to keep his home in Placerville, California. He feels the local Distract Attorney is doing nothing even when Fraud is uncovered.

LPS Asset Management Launches Short-Sale Service: “CAVEAT EMPTOR”

CAVEAT EMPTOR

March 22, 2010 – Lender Processing Services

 
LPS Asset Management Launches Short-Sale Service

Service helps lenders respond to short-sale offers more efficiently

Lender Processing Services, Inc. (NYSE:LPS) , a leading provider of integrated technology and services to the mortgage and real estate industries, is pleased to announce the launch of its professional short-sale service. Offered through LPS Asset Management Solutions, LPS’ short-sale solution helps servicers respond more quickly to short-sale offers and close more transactions.

In the current environment, servicers must be prepared to efficiently leverage alternatives like short sales. They must also be able to manage an increase in short-sale requests from borrowers and process the increased volume, while minimizing risk exposure and keeping operating complexity to a minimum.

‘As the need for short-sale management continues to increase, servicers must have an exceptionally efficient process in place for accuracy, timeliness and high-performance results,’ said Chad Neel, president of LPS Asset Management Solutions, LPS Field Services and LPS Auction Solutions. ‘With our extensive industry and short-sale experience and resources, we are ideally poised to help servicers streamline the short-sale process, enabling them to keep costs down and work with defaulted homeowners more effectively.’

LPS Asset Management Solutions has an established network of seasoned asset managers who manage, market and sell distressed and bank-owned properties, so servicers don’t have to experiment with alternatives or create alliances that may not offer the same benefits. LPS Asset Management Solutions’ ability to quickly draw upon related LPS resources, including property preservation and code enforcement services, title and closing services, analytics, valuations, MLS data and market trending data, offers servicers a powerful, comprehensive solution for its short-sale needs.

With the expertise and ability to assist servicers at any stage of the short-sale process, LPS works directly with its clients to review title; assess and resolve junior liens; review property values against short-sale offers; evaluate the equity position for each transaction; perform occupancy checks; and provide property preservation services, if necessary.

Additionally, LPS can coordinate short-sale offer reviews to provide guidance on whether the offers are in line with local market values and appropriate for the servicer’s objectives. Finally, LPS can either manage the entire closing process for short-sale offers that are accepted, or support servicers with property auction and deed-in-lieu services to expand the choices available to help clients and their borrowers conclude their transactions.

For more information regarding the LPS Asset Management Solutions’ short-sale services, call (720) 566-8025.

About Lender Processing Services

Lender Processing Services, Inc. (LPS) is a leading provider of integrated technology and services to the mortgage and real estate industries. LPS offers solutions that span the mortgage continuum, including lead generation, origination, servicing, workflow automation (LPS Desktop®) portfolio retention and default, augmented by the company’s award-winning customer support and professional services. Approximately 50 percent of all U.S. mortgages by volume are serviced using LPS’ Mortgage Servicing Package (MSP). LPS also offers proprietary mortgage and real estate data and analytics for the mortgage and capital markets industries. For more information about LPS, please visit http://www.lpsvcs.com.

 

Contact: Michelle Kersch Media +1-904-854-5043 michelle.kersch@lpsvcs.com
Company: Lender Processing Services, Jacksonville-Florida
Web Link: http://www.lpsvcs.com

Source: http://www.mortgagemag.com/news/2010/0316/1000016436070.htm

or see my write ups on them HERE

To ROB a COUNTRY, OWN a BANK: William Black

William Black, author of “Best way to rob a bank is to own one” talks about deliberate fraud on Wall St. courtesy of TheRealNews

Stop trying to get through the front door…use the back door…Get a Forensic Audit!

Not all Forensic Auditors are alike! FMI may locate exactly where the loan sits today.

 

This will make your lender WANT to communicate with you. Discover what they don’t want you to know. Go back in time and start from the minute you might have seen advertisements that got you hooked ” No Money Down” “100% Financing” “1% interest” “No income, No assetts” NO PROBLEM! Were you given proper disclosures on time, proper documents, was your loan broker providing you fiduciary guidance or did they hide undisclosed fees from you? Did they conceal illegal kickbacks? Did your broker tell you “Don’t worry before your new terms come due we will refinance you”? Did they inflate your appraisal? Did the developer coerce you to *USE* a certain “lender” and *USE* a certain title company?

If so you need a forensic audit. But keep in mind FMI:

DO NOT STOP FORECLOSURE

DO NOT NEGOTIATE ON YOUR BEHALF WITH YOUR BANK OR LENDER

DO NOT MODIFY YOUR LOAN

DO NOT TAKE CASES that is upto your attorney!

FMI does however, provide your Attorney with AMMO to bring your Lender into the negotiation table.

TKO BLOW x’2 to Law Offices of David J. Stern “Mill” Via Jeff Barnes, Esq. FDN

Yup! You heard it right X’s 2…I feel it’s going to be one of the great defense attorney’s in Florida that will bring down the MILL’s who are destroying families. Mark my words watch for Jeff Barnes, Matt Weidner, Greg Clark, George Gingo and Ice Law… Baby! Many other…Lets not forget the attorney who is diligently uncovering assignment fraud time after time Lynn Szymnoniak ESQ.

ANOTHER BORROWER VICTORY IN FLORIDA: JUDGE VACATES SUMMARY JUDGMENT WRONGFULLY OBTAINED BY LAW OFFICE OF DAVID J. STERN FOR DEUTSCHE BANK AS TRUSTEE FOR SECURITIZED MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST

March 17, 2010

FDN has obtained another borrower victory in Florida by having a summary judgment of foreclosure vacated. The Judge in the Brevard County Circuit Court has entered an Order, on motion of the borrower which was prepared, filed, and argued in person by Jeff Barnes, Esq., vacating and setting aside a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and enjoining any foreclosure sale. The Motion set forth that the Judgment was void as there was no proof of legal standing.

The Complaint, filed by the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A., alleged that the Plaintiff was the holder and owner of the note and mortgage by an assignment “to be filed”. No such assignment was ever filed, and thus Plaintiff Deutsche Bank fraudulently represented to the Court that it had proper legal standing to foreclose when in reality it did not. The threshold hurdle of proof of legal standing to foreclose under Florida law was recently highlighted by the Florida Second District Court of Appeal in the BAC Funding decision which was recently discussed on this website.

The same day that the hearing took place on the Brevard County Motion, FDN attorney Jeff Barnes, Esq. was presented with yet another case filed by the same attorney from the Stern law office for the same client (Deutsche Bank as “Trustee” of a securitized mortgage loan trust) with the same problem (no assignment or proof of VALID ownership of the Note and Mortgage) but filed in Manatee County, Florida with a summary judgment having been entered in favor of Deutsche Bank despite no assignment ever having been filed. A Motion has thus been filed to seek vacatur of the Stern Summary Judgment entered in this separate proceeding.

FDN litigates foreclosure cases throughout the State of Florida as well as in 27 other states, assisted by local counsel. The consistent pattern which is emerging, as to Deutsche Bank, is a misrepresentation of ownership of the Note and Mortgage (or “Deed of Trust” as it is called in non-judicial states other than Georgia, which terms the instrument a “Security Deed”); lack of valid ownership interest in these instruments and the rights attendant thereto; and a failure to produce competent evidence of any ownership (meaning that meritless MERS assignments are not “competent”). This pattern is present in numerous states with different law Firms. Deutsche Bank thus continues to be an entity whose representations must be carefully examined in any foreclosure attempt, because there is a high probability that one or more of its representations are false.

Jeff Barnes, Esq., www.ForeclosureDefenseNationwide.com

via 4closurefraud

Lender Processing Services Inc. (LPS) Revolving Door To Washington D.C.

Thursday, March 4, 2010
LPS opens Washington D.C. office

Jacksonville Business Journal – by Rachel Witkowski Staff reporter

Lender Processing Services Inc. recently opened an office in Washington, D.C. in order to attract more government work, the company announced Thursday.

The Jacksonville-based technology and services provider (NYSE: LPS) to the mortgage and real estate industries said having an office in the nation’s capital “gives LPS the ability to quickly respond to the needs of its government clients and to increase its presence by pursuing opportunities with new government partners.” (What exactly do they mean?)

The company said it is currently has contractual relationships with a number of federal agencies. The D.C. office will provide services including mortgage consulting, technology, portfolio data analytics and risk management as well as due diligence and valuation. (HUH? Due Diligence? See the Class Action on the Assignments they fabricated up in DOCx GA & LPS MN?)

“In today’s challenging economic environment, government agencies need expert support and data to make the most informed decisions, mitigate risks and operate at peak efficiency,” said LPS’ co-chief operating officer, Eric Swenson in the announcement. “LPS’ proven, robust technology solutions and extensive governmental expertise can help agencies quickly adapt to changing market conditions and regulatory requirements for optimal performance.”

Once again the Governement looking after the best interest of it’s people…NOT!

Program Will Pay Homeowners to Sell at a Loss…TIME OUT!! “We need to do a little house cleaning first” Mr. Obama.

WHOA! …before any of this BS happens. Who is going to address the Perpetual Fraud that exist? Is anyone from the government even doing any due diligence on any of the TOP FORECLOSURE HELP sites? WE HAVE DONE MOST OF YOUR WORK FOR YOU. Who is going to rescue the homeowners buying these fraudulent issues encumbered in these homes? In our illegal foreclosures today and yesterday? May I please have 1 day in the White House to fix all this because apparently they are digging all this up, even further. In order to fix this crap this needs to be fixed first. I think the government has learned a thing or 2 from these bankers (a bird in a hand is worth two in a bush). They are running with their heads in the dark! Go HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE and HERE…you see I did it for you!  For a start…YOU MUST FIX THESE ISSUES BEFORE ANYTHING!

If you feel like this is not enough then go here:
http://www.frauddigest.com
http://www.msfraud.org/
http://www.foreclosurehamle…
http://livinglies.wordpress…
http://4closurefraud.org/
http://stopforeclosurefraud…

Program Will Pay Homeowners to Sell at a Loss

By DAVID STREITFELD Published: March 7, 2010 NYTimes

In an effort to end the foreclosure crisis, the Obama administration has been trying to keep defaulting owners in their homes. Now it will take a new approach: paying some of them to leave.

This latest program, which will allow owners to sell for less than they owe and will give them a little cash to speed them on their way, is one of the administration’s most aggressive attempts to grapple with a problem that has defied solutions.

More than five million households are behind on their mortgages and risk foreclosure. The government’s $75 billion mortgage modification plan has helped only a small slice of them. Consumer advocates, economists and even some banking industry representatives say much more needs to be done.

For the administration, there is also the concern that millions of foreclosures could delay or even reverse the economy’s tentative recovery — the last thing it wants in an election year.

Taking effect on April 5, the program could encourage hundreds of thousands of delinquent borrowers who have not been rescued by the loan modification program to shed their houses through a process known as a short sale, in which property is sold for less than the balance of the mortgage. Lenders will be compelled to accept that arrangement, forgiving the difference between the market price of the property and what they are owed.

“We want to streamline and standardize the short sale process to make it much easier on the borrower and much easier on the lender,” said Seth Wheeler, a Treasury senior adviser.

The problem is highlighted by a routine case in Phoenix. Chris Paul, a real estate agent, has a house he is trying to sell on behalf of its owner, who owes $150,000. Mr. Paul has an offer for $48,000, but the bank holding the mortgage says it wants at least $90,000. The frustrated owner is now contemplating foreclosure.

To bring the various parties to the table — the homeowner, the lender that services the loan, the investor that owns the loan, the bank that owns the second mortgage on the property — the government intends to spread its cash around.

Under the new program, the servicing bank, as with all modifications, will get $1,000. Another $1,000 can go toward a second loan, if there is one. And for the first time the government would give money to the distressed homeowners themselves. They will get $1,500 in “relocation assistance.”

Should the incentives prove successful, the short sales program could have multiple benefits. For the investment pools that own many home loans, there is the prospect of getting more money with a sale than with a foreclosure.

For the borrowers, there is the likelihood of suffering less damage to credit ratings. And as part of the transaction, they will get the lender’s assurance that they will not later be sued for an unpaid mortgage balance.

For communities, the plan will mean fewer empty foreclosed houses waiting to be sold by banks. By some estimates, as many as half of all foreclosed properties are ransacked by either the former owners or vandals, which depresses the value of the property further and pulls down the value of neighboring homes.

If short sales are about to have their moment, it has been a long time coming. At the beginning of the foreclosure crisis, lenders shunned short sales. They were not equipped to deal with the labor-intensive process and were suspicious of it.

The lenders’ thinking, said the economist Thomas Lawler, went like this: “I lend someone $200,000 to buy a house. Then he says, ‘Look, I have someone willing to pay $150,000 for it; otherwise I think I’m going to default.’ Do I really believe the borrower can’t pay it back? And is $150,000 a reasonable offer for the property?”

Short sales are “tailor-made for fraud,” said Mr. Lawler, a former executive at the mortgage finance company Fannie Mae.

Last year, short sales started to increase, although they remain relatively uncommon. Fannie Mae said preforeclosure deals on loans in its portfolio more than tripled in 2009, to 36,968. But real estate agents say many lenders still seem to disapprove of short sales.

Under the new federal program, a lender will use real estate agents to determine the value of a home and thus the minimum to accept. This figure will not be shared with the owner, but if an offer comes in that is equal to or higher than this amount, the lender must take it.

Mr. Paul, the Phoenix agent, was skeptical. “In a perfect world, this would work,” he said. “But because estimates of value are inherently subjective, it won’t. The banks don’t want to sell at a discount.”

There are myriad other potential conflicts over short sales that may not be solved by the program, which was announced on Nov. 30 but whose details are still being fine-tuned. Many would-be short sellers have second and even third mortgages on their houses. Banks that own these loans are in a position to block any sale unless they get a piece of the deal.

“You have one loan, it’s no sweat to get a short sale,” said Howard Chase, a Miami Beach agent who says he does around 20 short sales a month. “But the second mortgage often is the obstacle.”

Major lenders seem to be taking a cautious approach to the new initiative. In many cases, big banks do not actually own the mortgages; they simply administer them and collect payments. J. K. Huey, a Wells Fargo vice president, said a short sale, like a loan modification, would have to meet the requirements of the investor who owns the loan.

“This is not an opportunity for the customer to just walk away,” Ms. Huey said. “If someone doesn’t come to us saying, ‘I’ve done everything I can, I used all my savings, I borrowed money and, by the way, I’m losing my job and moving to another city, and have all the documentation,’ we’re not going to do a short sale.”

But even if lenders want to treat short sales as a last resort for desperate borrowers, in reality the standards seem to be looser.

Sree Reddy, a lawyer and commercial real estate investor who lives in Miami Beach, bought a one-bedroom condominium in 2005, spent about $30,000 on improvements and ended up owing $540,000. Three years later, the value had fallen by 40 percent.

Mr. Reddy wanted to get out from under his crushing monthly payments. He lost a lot of money in the crash but was not in default. Nevertheless, his bank let him sell the place for $360,000 last summer.

“A short sale provides peace of mind,” said Mr. Reddy, 32. “If you’re in foreclosure, you don’t know when they’re ultimately going to take the place away from you.”

Mr. Reddy still lives in the apartment complex where he bought that condo, but is now a renter paying about half of his old mortgage payment. Another benefit, he said: “The place I’m in now is nicer and a little bigger.”