LPS Using TARP Funds to Cover-Up Assignment of Mortgage

Consumer ID thefts or consumer identity thefts is one of the main crimes that cause financial as well as emotional anguish. The rubber-stamping of Assignments of Mortgage and the Double Dipping of foreclosure fees and cost expedite the foreclosure process and line the silk pockets of these attorneys, banks and LPS executives.

This is a copy of the September 14, 2009 e-mail from Adrian Lofton to Bradley Johnson, lead Attorney at Taylor, Day, Currie, Boyd and Johnson apprizing him of their TARP fund violations.

Brad, your firm has created a conflict of interest by representing these banks. In addition to the aforementioned, you are not legally entitled to accept TARP funds to represent these banks after your firm implicated them in these federal violations.
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Florida AG investigating LPS subsidiary: Jacksonville Business Journal

Monday, May 17, 2010, 1:50pm EDT  |  Modified: Monday, May 17, 2010, 1:51pm

Jacksonville Business Journal – by Christian Conte Staff Writer

The Florida Attorney General’s Office has launched a civil investigation similar to one launched by a Florida U.S. Attorney’s Office against Fidelity National Financial Inc. and Lender Processing Services Inc., along with an LPS subsidiary, relating to possible forged documents in foreclosure cases.

According to the Attorney General’s website, DOCX LLC, based in Alpharetta, Ga., “seems to be creating and manufacturing ‘bogus assignments’ of mortgage in order that foreclosures may go through more quickly and efficiently. These documents appear to be forged, incorrectly and illegally executed, false and misleading. These documents are used in court cases as ‘real’ documents of assignment and presented to the court as so, when it actually appears that they are fabricated in order to meet the documentation to foreclosure according to law.”

The Attorney General’s Economic Crimes Division in Fort Lauderdale is handling the case.

Fidelity National Financial (NYSE: FNF), based in Jacksonville, provides title insurance, specialty insurance, claims management services and information services. Lender Processing Services (NYSE: LPS), also based in Jacksonville, provides mortgage processing services, settlement services, mortgage performance analytics and default solutions.

Fidelity National acquired DOCX, which processes and files lien releases and mortgage assignments for lenders, in 2005.

The U.S. Attorney’s office launched its investigation of DOCX in February.

LPS stated in its 2009 annual report that there was a “business process that caused an error in the notarization” of mortgage documents, some in the foreclosure proceedings in “various jurisdictions around the country,” according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

While the company said it fixed the problem, the annual report stated it spurred an inquiry by the Clerk of Superior Court in Fulton County, Ga., and most recently, LPS was notified by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Florida, based in Tampa, that it is also investigating the “business processes” of DOCX.

cconte@bizjournals.com | 265-2227
Read more: Florida AG investigating LPS subsidiary – Jacksonville Business Journal:

RELATED STORY: MISSION: VOID LENDER PROCESSING SERVICES “ASSIGNMENTS”

WJFA – Thwarting Illegal Foreclosure Auction…LISTEN UP EVERYONE!

source:http://www.wjfa.net I highly recommend you read this excellent information.

Putting real estate thieves on notice prevents** any one buying your house and claiming they didn’t know about the fraud.

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Federal money to knock down 450 blighted properties in 45 days: MICHIGAN

You mean to tell me you cannot place homeless families in these?? Lets get Habitat for Humanity in here…this doesn’t smell right!

Clergy, Wayne County Partner To Demolish Homes

Sarah Cwiek (2010-05-11)
One of the homes targeted for demolition in Detroit Sarah Cwiek/Michigan Radio

DETROIT, MI (MICHIGAN RADIO) – Wayne County and some of Detroit’s biggest religious institutions are partnering in a push to demolish vacant homes.

The plan is to use more than $4 million in Federal money to knock down 450 blighted properties in 45 days.

12 clergy members worked with the County to identify “target areas” for demolition near their churches. A number of the leaders plan to use that land to develop housing projects.

Bishop Edgar Vann of Second Ebenezer Church says that’s appropriate because churches are rooted in the community.

“You don’t see other developers coming in here to in any great numbers to try to develop communities,” Vann says. “We’re the ones, along with the partnerships that we have, who are taking this on because we have the people in our hearts.”

There are an estimated 33,000 vacant homes within the city of Detroit. The city demolished 860 last year.
© Copyright 2010, Michigan Radio

Threat of Shadow Inventory Diminishing: Barclays

Imagine what your value will be worth after all these “shadow inventory” is finally released. Again, I hold a real estate license and can tell you I have access to some of this shadow inventory and it is not pretty to look at. Barclays report below is only one source!

In Michigan they are demolishing homes like you cannot imagine…But I may know exactly why…”Greece” is a hint.

BY: CARRIE BAY DSNEWS.com

Analysts at Barclays Capital say the industry’s ominous shadow inventory is close to topping out.

New research published by the firm says the supply of homes nearing REO status, defined as 90 or more days delinquent or in the process of foreclosure, will peak this summer and then begin falling gradually as the market becomes stable enough to absorb 130,000 distressed properties a month.

“While we expect REO levels to remain elevated, the trickle of homes from foreclosure into REO implies moderate levels of inventory reaching market,” Barclays said in its report.

The company estimates the current REO supply to be 478,000 and expects it to rise to 536,000 by late 2011.

Barclays’ delinquency pipeline snapshot shows that as of February, there were 2.4 million mortgages at least 90 days past due and 2.1 million more already winding through the foreclosure process, which combined makes up a shadow inventory of 4.5 million.

It’s a daunting tally and could grow larger as foreclosure alternatives are exhausted, but Barclays’ model forecasts 4.7 million distressed sales over the next three years, with 1.6 million coming in 2010, 1.6 million in 2011, and 1.5 million in 2012.

The research firm notes, however, that an orderly liquidation of shadow inventory will require both “more robust household formation and job growth.”

Some market indicators, though, are looking favorable. This week, Fannie Mae reported only a minor increase in its March serious delinquency rate – 5.59 percent versus 5.51 percent in February. RealtyTrac also reported a 12 percent month-to-month decline in default notices for April.

Barclays says this data supports its forecast that the industry is only a few months away from reaching peak levels of shadow inventory.